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  • Investigation of the Predictive Accuracy in the Catchment Modelling for Toowoomba Region and an Assessment of Catchment Behaviour in Response to Extreme Events

Research Thesis Topic

Investigation of the Predictive Accuracy in the Catchment Modelling for Toowoomba Region and an Assessment of Catchment Behaviour in Response to Extreme Events


Topic ID
234

Thesis Topic/Title
Investigation of the Predictive Accuracy in the Catchment Modelling for Toowoomba Region and an Assessment of Catchment Behaviour in Response to Extreme Events

Description

Since 2011 flood, a number of mitigation measures have been implemented for reducing the risk of flooding in Toowoomba and surrounding region. However, an assessment of the vulnerabilities of existing infrastructures under extreme flood events and the future expansion load is necessary to determine the effectiveness of the measures for flood proofing. Toowoomba Regional Council (TRC) has developed and maintained a suite of hydrological and hydraulic models for catchment planning and management. A confidence needs to be built in the existing modelling tools accounting the recent upgrades in the drainage system and changes in hydrologic characteristic. The change in land use pattern considerably affects the runoff characteristics. The loss of open space and floodplain storages has been the issue for major flooding. The drainage system has been upgraded recently with detention basins for reducing the floods risks. However, the undersized structures such as culverts, bridges and sluices gates create drainage congestion in various parts of the catchment from low to moderate level flooding. A proper water balance of catchment storages and accounting of hydrologic losses are necessary components for improved modelling, which will be investigated in this study. The project aims to be undertaken through 1) hydrological monitoring of runoff and infiltration losses in various part of the catchment; 2) development of the methodology to improve the loss function used in the hydrologic model; 3) updating the existing models and evaluation of models performance; 4) Assessment of land use and climate change impact on runoff characteristics; and 5) evaluation of the drainage performance in upgrading and accommodating the future changes. The research will be highly innovative through adopting latest technology and advanced methods in computational modelling. The study will develop a tool for proper accounting of hydrologic losses, which will provide a greater accuracy in Council’s existing models for predicting catchment runoff and stream flow.


Principal Supervisor

Associate Supervisors

Research Affiliations
  • School of Civil Engineering and Surveying

Field of Research
  • Civil Engineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Other Earth Sciences

Available Academic Programs

Application Open Date
06/10/2016

Application Close Date
31/12/2020

USQ Scholarship Applications

Other Scholarship Funding Details
USQ External funding

Pre-approved for Ethics
Not Applicable

Admission Requirements

Please review the admission requirements for the academic program associated with this Thesis Topic




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