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  • Resistance to Root-lesion Nematode in Australian and International Mungbean Cultivars and Germplasm Sources in Relation to their Molecular Diversity and Geographic Origin

Research Thesis Topic

Resistance to Root-lesion Nematode in Australian and International Mungbean Cultivars and Germplasm Sources in Relation to their Molecular Diversity and Geographic Origin


Topic ID
180

Thesis Topic/Title
Resistance to Root-lesion Nematode in Australian and International Mungbean Cultivars and Germplasm Sources in Relation to their Molecular Diversity and Geographic Origin

Description

Pratylenchus spp. called root-lesion nematodes are among the most damaging nematode pests of agricultural and horticultural crops world-wide. The species Pratylenchus thornei attacks cereal and legume grain crops (pulses) in Australia and many other countries throughout the world. In Australia it causes substantial yield loss in wheat (greater than 50% in intolerant varieties) and about 20% yield loss in intolerant chickpea varieties. It is also hosted by other grain crops grown in rotation such as barley, fababean, mungbean and soybean. In the northern grain region of Australia, mungbean (Vigna radiata) is the most important summer-grown pulse crop. The susceptibility of mungbean crops to P. thornei limits their benefits (such as nitrogen fixation and fungal disease breaks) to wheat grown in rotation. Despite this limitation to the uptake of mungbean growing by grain farmers there is no active breeding program for resistance to P. thornei in mungbean. The proposed research will start to redress this situation.


Principal Supervisor

Associate Supervisors

Research Affiliations
  • Centre for Crop Health
  • Institute for Agriculture and the Environment

Field of Research
  • Crop and Pasture Production


Application Open Date
04/06/2016

Application Close Date
04/06/2019

USQ Scholarship Applications

Pre-approved for Ethics
Not Applicable

Admission Requirements

Please review the admission requirements for the academic program associated with this Thesis Topic




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