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Research Thesis Topic

The Degradation of Alkali-activated Cements and the Implication to Concrete Durability


Topic ID
166

Thesis Topic/Title
The Degradation of Alkali-activated Cements and the Implication to Concrete Durability

Description

Alkali-activated cements (AACs) are manufactured from industrial waste materials, such as coal combustion ash (fly ash) and slag. They possess the lower CO2 emissions, lower energy consumption than conventional Portland cement but equivalent mechanical properties that can satisfy for construction purposes. One of the biggest challenges to scale-up the industry application of this type of sustainable materials is the uncertainty of durability. Are these materials durable over time, for decades, even longer? This project aims to investigate to the molecular structure and microstructure of AACs with three levels of Ca/Si ratio and understand their degradation under simulated but accelerated service conditions, for example, the marine conditions, the sewage conditions, and the ambient conditions. The degradation of the AACs due to concentrated salt (sulphates) attract, biochemical attack and accelerated carbonation and efflorescence impacts will be revealed and related to the durability of AAC concretes. This project will present world-leading knowledge and transformable skills of green cement development and manufacturing.


Principal Supervisor

Associate Supervisors

Research Affiliations
  • Computational Engineering and Science Research Centre
  • School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
  • School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering

Field of Research
  • Civil Engineering
  • Materials Engineering


Application Open Date
04/06/2016

Application Close Date
04/06/2019

USQ Scholarship Applications

Other Scholarship Funding Details
ARC discovery project - http://www.usq.edu.au/news-events/news/2015/11/arc-green-cement

Pre-approved for Ethics
No

Admission Requirements

Please review the admission requirements for the academic program associated with this Thesis Topic

Students with Materials Science and Engineering background are encouraged; particularly welcome students who have Chemistry and Molecular Dynamic Modelling or Cement and Concrete expertise




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